DNA is packaged in a chromosome experiment

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A nucleosome is the basic unit of DNA packaging in eukaryotes, consisting of a segment of DNA wound in sequence around four histone protein cores.[1] This structure is often compared to thread wrapped around a spool.[2]

Nucleosomes form the fundamental repeating units of eukaryotic chromatin,[3] which is used to pack the large eukaryotic genomes into the nucleus while still ensuring appropriate access to it (in mammalian cells approximately 2 m of linear DNA have to be packed into a nucleus of roughly 10 ┬Ám diameter). Nucleosomes are folded through a series of successively higher order structures to eventually form a chromosome; this both compacts DNA and creates an added layer of regulatory control, which ensures correct gene expression. Nucleosomes are thought to carry epigenetically inherited information in the form of covalent modifications of their core histones. Nucleosomes were observed as particles in the electron microscope by Don and Ada Olins [4] and their existence and structure (as histone octamers surrounded by approximately 200 base pairs of DNA) were proposed by Roger Kornberg.[5][6] The role of the nucleosome as a general gene repressor was demonstrated by Lorch et al. in vitro [7] and by Han and Grunstein in vivo.